NAME PHONE EMAIL ADDRESS ADDRESS DETAIL ADDRESS CITY ADDRESS STATE ADDRESS ZIPCODE CREDENTIALS CURRENT EMPLOYER JOB DESCRIPTION ABSTRACT CONFERENCE ABSTRACT TYPE PREVIOUSLY PRESENTED ISAPN AREAS OF EXPERTISE OTHER AREAS OF EXPERTISE ISAPN FOCUS ANA-ILLINOIS FOCUS CONTENT LEVEL ABSTRACT ABOUT PRESENTER DEADLINE ACCEPTANCE OBJECTIVES PHARMACOLOGY CREDIT ISAPN TEACHING METHOD ISAPN TEACHING METHOD TIME: LECTURE ISAPN TEACHING METHOD TIME: DEMONSTRATION ISAPN TEACHING METHOD TIME: DISCUSSION ISAPN TEACHING METHOD TIME: WORKSHOP ANA-ILLINOIS TEACHING METHOD ANA-ILLINOIS TEACHING METHOD: DISCUSSION ANA-ILLINOIS TEACHING METHOD: LECTURE PARTICIPANTS REFERENCES CONFLICT OF INTEREST COI CATEGORY COI DESCRIPTION: SALARY COI DESCRIPTION: ROYALTY COI DESCRIPTION: STOCK COI DESCRIPTION: SPEAKING BUREAU COI DESCRIPTION: CONSULTANT COI DESCRIPTION: OTHER AGREEMENT
Lori Hopwood 217-556-6857 lhopwood@lfpc.net 797 Settles Trail Fillmore Illinois 62032 MPH, MSN, BSN, RN, WHNP-BC, FNP-BC, NHDP-BC Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Mental Health Family Health Yes Yes
Lori Hopwood 217-556-6857 lhopwood@lfpc.net 797 Settles Trail Fillmore Illinois 62032 MPH, MSN, BSN, RN, WHNP-BC, FNP-BC, NHDP-BC Litchfield Family Practice Primary Care Provider-Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Mental Health Family Practice, Public Health Patient Care Advanced

Litchfield Family Practice Center is implementing an Integrated Care Model that combines primary care and mental health care in one setting.  “The Integrated Care Model is important because nearly half of all mental health disorders are cared for in a primary care setting, like the doctor’s office.  Many with serious mental health conditions also have higher rates of chronic disease.  People with common physical health conditions also have higher rates of mental health issues.  Providing integrated care helps patients and their providers by blending the expertise of mental health and primary care clinicians, with feedback from patients and their caregivers.  This creates a team-based service delivery model where primary care and mental health care are offered in the same setting.  Coordinating primary care and mental health care can help address physical health problems of people with serious mental illnesses.  This model is a holistic way of addressing the whole person providing cost-effective care.  People who may not have access to mental health care may prefer to visit their primary care provider for services.  Many primary care providers are comfortable and very capable of treating mental disorders.  In the past, it has been difficult for primary care providers to offer cost-effective, high-quality mental health care when working alone.  Combining mental health services/expertise with primary care can reduce costs, increase the quality of care and ultimately, save lives” (The National Institute of Mental Health, 2019).

Integrated Care is a wholistic type of care model that meets all patient’s health needs in one setting. The integrated model emphasizes a practice change in the way our clinic delivers mental health services in the primary care setting.  Medical and mental health work simultaneously to treat patients behavioral and medical needs with shared medical record access. Our team-based collaborative care program adds two types of services to the usual primary care setting: behavioral health care management and consultation with a psychiatrist. We provide comprehensive care under a safety net of frequent contacts, and linkage to needed community resources.

Yes 1. Engage clients in the integrated service delivery model who require a variety of mental health services. , 2. Assess client’s needs and desires in their treatment and plan for recovery., 3. Advocate for appropriate services including treatment, counseling and linkage to other community agencies or resources., 4. Monitor quality of services with the administration of evidence-based assessment tools and patient satisfaction surveys., 5. Assist clients and significant others with the many requirements of negotiating the service system. 45 Minutes -- -- -- -- 45 Minutes

AIMS Center Advancing Integrated Mental Health Solutions.  Retrieved February 2, 2019.  https://aims.uw.edu/collaborative-care/team-structure

National Institute of Health.  Retrieved February 2, 2019, from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/index.shtml

SAMHSA Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration.  Retrieved February 2, 2019, from https://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

 

Lori A. Hopwood
Brigid Smigiel 7735201026 bsmigi2@uic.edu 2830 N. Burling Street Apartment F Chicago Illinois 60657 BSN, RN, CPN, CMSRN Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago Registered Nurse and DNP Student at UIC College of Nursing APRN Midwest Conference Poster Pediatric Clinical General Knowledge

Clinical Issue/Practice Problem: Care coordination, a critical strategy to improve health quality, has been linked to improved continuity, streamlined processes, and decreased hospitalizations and costs. Barriers include a shortage of primary providers, heavy workloads, fragmentation of health sectors, decreased funding, and patient complexity.

Summary of Supporting Literature: Coordination tasks for complex patients occur with greater urgency and frequency than for non-complex patients. Implementing criteria to identify complex patients allows for development of separate work flows. Care coordination pathways improve coordination by creating standardized processes to promote accountability, continuity, and information exchange.

Project Implementation: A care coordination pathway was developed and implemented at a small nurse led primary care clinic. Primary outcomes were staff satisfaction and pathway effectiveness. Staff survey responses were collected pre and post-implementation. Patient outcomes were assessed using a chart audit tool.

Outcomes: 23 patients were added to the pathway. The most common coordination goal was completion of ordered referrals (100%, n = 23). Pathway adherence rates were 82.6% for nurse practitioners and 17.4% for the registered nurse. Family nurse practitioners report satisfaction with the pathway. There was no post-implementation response from the registered nurse.

Clinical Implications for Practice and Next Steps: A new process for identifying complex patients for targeted care coordination efforts was implemented. Monitoring of patient specific outcomes over time is required to assess pathway efficacy in improving care coordination.

My passion is to improve the health status of Chicago residents by empowering patients to take charge of their own health and wellness through education, quality primary health care, increased access to community based resources, and promoting health policy research and advocacy. Exploring methods to improve care coordination for high complexity patients is a critical action needed to ensure patient’s are able to assume ownership of their unique health needs.

Yes Develop and implement a consistent and reliable process for care coordination for complex patients. -- 30 Minutes -- -- -- -- Brigid Smigiel
Jessica Gill 6308128342 jgill23@uic.edu 2478 River Hills Lane Bolingbrook Illinois 60490 CMSRN Rush University Medical Center APRN Midwest Conference Poster Infectious Disease HIV/AIDs Patient Care General Knowledge

Background: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective HIV prevention strategy and could reduce HIV disparities among African Americans on Chicago’s West Side. Despite a national increase in the awareness of PrEP, PrEP use remains low among African American people at risk for HIV.

Methods: Snowball sampling was used to interview 20 Chicago-area community based providers and 20 African American clients at a federally qualified health center on Chicago’s West side.

Intervention: Interviews between these two groups of stakeholders was used to identify the perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of a smartphone-based telehealth application for delivering and accessing PrEP.

Results: Ninety percent of African American clients viewed a smartphone-based telehealth application to be an acceptable modality to access PrEP. Clients perceived a smartphone-based telehealth application to be useful for preventing HIV in their community and easy to use to access PrEP. Only 55% of Chicago-area community-based providers viewed telehealth as an acceptable modality to deliver PrEP. Healthcare providers perceived telehealth useful for addressing socio-structural barriers to access, but perceived reduced ease of use due to the lack of telehealth technology infrastructure, organizational and policy barriers.

Conclusions: There is a digital divide among Chicago-area community-based providers serving underserved communities due to perceived organizational barriers to telehealth despite African American clients expressing their willingness and the acceptability of utilizing a smartphone-based telehealth application for accessing preventative medicine likePrEP.

As a family nurse practitioner student at UIC at Chicago, I operationalized my commitment to health equity by applying for a competitive position in a year-long clinical immersion program with a clinical partner in the community. This program aims to provide access to high quality healthcare for the medically underserved on Chicago’s West Side. Absent of major changes, 50% of African American men who have sex with men (MSM) contract HIV in their lifetime, and some of the highest disparities are on Chicago’s West Side. I am laying the groundwork to expand access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis to African Americans.

Yes Yes
Maryam Syed 7735937831 msyed22@uic.edu 5852 W. Irving park road Unit 5 chicago Illinois 60634 BSN, RN Rush University Medical Center Registered Nurse on General Medicine APRN Midwest Conference Poster Infectious Disease Patient Care Advanced

I have been a Registered Nurse for 6 years. For the first 4 years I worked on adult psychiatry. There I was in contact with multiple individuals who were living with HIV. This sparked an interest in how we can improve HIV care, specifically among the LGBTQ community. Even with advancements in medicine, there are still individuals who remains undiagnosed and untreated.

Yes Identify disparities in HIV prevention and care, Identify evidence-based interventions to decrease HIV transmission, Implementing HIV prevention strategies in community and public health N/A (not applicable) -- -- -- -- -- -- Yes
Maria Jefferson-Walker 773-680-7296 walkerj118@att.net 11834 S Oakley Ave Chicago Illinois 60643 DNPc, APRN, FNP-BC Franciscan Health Alliance Family Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Family Medicine, Primary Care Patient Care Advanced

The Direct Primary Care Model (DPC) is an avenue which must be considered. Direct primary care is an arrangement between the provider and the patient. The need for health insurance is eliminated for primary care services and reserved for specialized care, some diagnostic testing, and catastrophic events. Patients pay the provider a flat monthly rate, on average $50 to $80 per month, in exchange for a specified set of primary care services (Chase, 2013). However, there is a paucity of scholarly literature that supports the advanced practice registered nurse’s (APRN) current role and contributions to the advancement of the DPC Model. There is also lack of support from national and regional nursing organizations, for this patient-focused innovative model that is improving health outcomes. Inclusivity of the APRN within peer reviewed literature, as a provider of the DPC model is essential to the improvement of our fragmented current healthcare system. This DNP Scholarly Project applies the DPC model to the scope of practice of APRNs in the primary care setting. Utilizing Starfields Model as a conceptual framework, the author seeks to illustrate the APRNs potential to enhance the patient experience, improve preventive health outcomes, and expand affordability of care following the DPC model. APRN lead DPC practices are excluded from peer reviewed literature. The result of this is that the APRNs potential to improve the patients’ healthcare experiences, overall health outcomes and affordability of care is under-represented.

Maria Jefferson-Walker, has over 20 years of healthcare experience, and is the founder and CEO of Hope Wellness Center & Spa, in Chicago since 2017. She has joined the community of innovators that are practicing Direct Primary Care (DPC), membership based affordable health care. As a visionary, Maria believes that educating the nursing community about the DPC model will benefit consumers and restore their expectation of high quality, patient centered health care. Maria’s focus is on providing improved access to high quality primary care. Hope Wellness Center & Spa has helped Maria find peace in her passion.

Yes By the end of this presentation the participant will be able to list the benefits of Direct Primary Care (DPC), and compare and contrast between similar models. , By the end of this presentation the participant will be able to state how Direct Primary Care (DPC) aligns with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Acts (ACA), Triple Aim Initiative. , By the end of this presentation the participant will be able to recognize the benefits of educating consumers about Direct Primary Care (DPC), and identify how to locate DPC providers across the country. -- -- 15 Minutes -- 15 Minutes --

DPCfrontier.com
Face Book: Nurse Practitioners in Direct Primary Care

Maria Jefferson-Walker
Maryam Syed 7735937831 msyed22@uic.edu 5852 W. Irving park road Unit 5 chicago Illinois 60634 BSN, RN Rush University Medical Center Registered Nurse on General Medicine APRN Midwest Conference Poster Infectious Disease Patient Care Advanced

Background Annual new HIV infections in the United States have declined 10% from 2010 to 2014. However, this progress has been disproportionate, with an increase in annual infections amongst certain populations. Disparities in HIV prevention and care persist among racial/ethnic and sexual minority populations.
Objective: The objective of this quality improvement project was to create a toolkit that an urban LGBTQ-serving community-based organization (CBO) can use to decrease rates of HIV infection.
Methods: After a comprehensive literature review of evidence-based HIV prevention strategies, the project team administered a series of surveys to a CBO’s staff and clients over the course of four weeks. The survey included data on demographics and perceptions of the value of evidence-based behavioral, biomedical, and structural strategies for HIV prevention.
Results: Staff and clients report that having community and social support plays an important role in HIV prevention. Seventy-seven percent of staff and 60% of clients strongly agree that it is important for community-based organizations to offer HIV testing. Staff (80%) and clients (69%) strongly agree that prevention education, including how to use condoms, where to access needle exchange programs, and where to access pre-exposure prophylaxis.
Conclusions: Our QI project suggests that CBOs that serve urban LGBTQ communities should consider offering HIV testing as well as linkage to mental and behavioral health services. An unexpected finding of this QI project was clients’ desire for more formal instruction in how to properly use condoms.

I started my first job as a registered nurse on Adult Psychiatry in 2013, where I found a unique interest in HIV. During my time there I encountered numerous individuals who were living with HIV, many of whom were non-compliant with treatment. This motivated me to further look into HIV care, prevention, and barriers to treatment. I wanted to know what we could do as health care providers to provide better HIV care and to decrease transmission rates.

Yes Identify disparities in HIV prevention , Identify HIV prevention interventions, Identify the role of Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in HIV prevention 30 Minutes -- 15 Minutes -- 15 Minutes 30 Minutes Maryam Syed
Minseung Chu 8723010230 minseung829@gmail.com 1253 W. Flournoy St. 4th CHICAGO Illinois 60607 RN,BSN University of Illinois at Chicago DNP Student APRN Midwest Conference Poster Infectious Disease HIV, LGBTQ Clinical General Knowledge Yes -- -- -- -- -- --
Michael Huyck 7736217775 michael.huyck@gmail.com 2301 HAINSWORTH AVE North Riverside Illinois 60546 Registered Nurse Jesse Brown Veteran's Medical Center Registered Nurse -Resource RN, ED, Psych, Med-Surg, Telemetry, Step-down ICU APRN Midwest Conference Poster Mental Health Emergency Department Clinical Advanced

Topic: Wound Care for People Who Inject Drugs

Length: 30 minutes

Michael Huyck BSN, RN-CEN

Mhuyck2@uic.edu     773-621-7775

Abstract

Topic: People who inject drugs (PWID) are at an increased risk for developing chronic wounds in addition to skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) which includes abscesses, and cellulitis. Healthcare access within the PWID community has been traditionally limited due to factors such as poverty, stigmatization, and fear of withdrawal. Consequently, chronic and acute wounds are often left untreated, self-treated, or present to Emergency Departments. To address this burden, a community based wound care program was established at a Chicago syringe exchange as part of a University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) FNP-DNP program capstone project.

Methods: A community based wound care program for PWID was implemented at a Chicago syringe exchange between April and August, 2019. Program interventions included staff training, formulary development, and providing direct clinical support regarding wound care techniques.  Evidence translation through clinical treatment pathways was implemented to standardize wound care assessment, treatment, and procedures.

Objective: APRN’s will gain an understanding of the prevalence and determinants of wounds within PWID. Clinicians will gain knowledge of wound care techniques and community-based interventions for addressing wounds in injectors. Increased clinical knowledge will provide tools to further address cutaneous related complications of the opioid epidemic.

I am a registered nurse with 7 years of experience currently attending the UIC FNP-DNP program with a projected graduation in May 2020. Currently working as a float RN at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois caring for a diverse group of Veterans from the critically ill to the psychiatric population. My expertise involves emergency department, psychiatric, medical surgical, telemetry and step-down ICU care. I have spent the entirety of my career caring for under-served populations and am currently helping develop a community wound care program for injection drug users within a Chicago syringe exchange.

Yes Determinants and Etiology of Wounds in People Who Inject Drugs (PWID), Barriers to Wound Care in PWID, Techniques to Promote Wound Healing in PWID N/A (not applicable) Lecture, Discussion -- -- -- -- -- --

Community Outreach Intervention Project Guide:

Wound Care for People Who Inject Drugs

Michael Anthony Huyck
Maurjeen 309-253-3127 maureen.l.mathews@osfhealthcare.org 818 W. St. James Peoria Illinois 61606 DNP, APN, CNP OSF Healthcare Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Yes Neurology Patient Care General Knowledge

Background; Anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in non-atrial fibrillation related stroke patients remains controversial. This retrospective review examines outcome of patients with basilar or vertebral diseases on long-term warfarin therapy for secondary prevention. Method: Retrospective review, approved by community IRB. Records of patients with posterior circulation stroke from 2010 to 2018 were reviewed. Data collected and analyzed included demographics, stroke location, responsible vertebral basilar diseases, duration of warfarin use, mRS at stroke onset and ast clinical visit, hemorrhagic events and mortality. Descriptive statistic and Cox multivariable analysis for outcome if warfarin was discontinued. Results: Of 48 patients with imaging proven vertebral and basilar arterial disease and related strokes, 35 (72%) were female; average age 65(37-89). Locations of stroke included 21 pontine, 21 cerebellar, 6 occipital, 4 in medulla. Imaging showed 24 with vertebral artery stenosis, 15 with vertebral-basilar arteriopathy, and 9 with basilar stenosis. Longest use of warfarin was 8 years (1-96 , average 26 months). Average MRS at onset was 1.75 and 1.14 at discharge. Two (4%) had sICH,2 (4%) recurrent strokes, 4(8%) had recurrent TIAs and 2 (2%) had GI bleed. One died of ICH. Thirty seven (78%) had no had no further stroke/TIA events. The average INR was 2.46 (1.4-4.1). Patients with warfarin discontinued were more likely to use aspirin and had negative outcomes (stroke/TIA recurrence, hemorrhage), HR 5.41(95% CI, 1.16-25.3). Conclusion: Vertebral basilar and brain stem strokes are disabling and deadly. Antithrombotic therapy for secondary prevention in this population remains controversial. A large clinical trial recommended.

I have been working in Stroke Neurology since 2002.  Although the death rate from stroke has decreased, stroke remains the leading cause of disability.  Advances have been made in providing acute treatment, but progress in life long care of the survivor and Rehabilitation opportunities have been slow to progress.  Posterior circulation strokes can be devastating and recurrent stroke can be difficult to prevent in this subset of the stroke population.  In my practice we continue to look for effective ways to prevent recurrent injury.

Yes .25 (25 percent) -- -- -- -- -- --

limited reference list of pertinent literature:

Mohr, J.P., Thompson, J.L.P., Lazar, R.M., Original Article: A Comparison of Warfarin and Aspirin for the Prevention of Recurrent Ischemic Stroke. N Engl J Med 2001; 345:1444-1451.
Sandercock, Peter, Counsell, Carl, Kane, Edward. Anticoagulants for acute ischaemic stroke.  12 March 2015, DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000024.pub4.

Maureen Mathews
Kristen Zdany 2623441773 kbeyersm@gmail.com 109 Tower Court Fox River Grove Illinois 60021 RN, BSN, DNP, AGNP-C Northwestern Medicine APRN Midwest Conference Poster Geriatric Caregiver Education Advanced

Survey Analysis of Emergency Departments Readiness for the Elderly Population

To date, the massive 20.8 million Emergency Department (ED) visits among older adults 65 years and above call out the need for consistent geriatric evidence-based standards of practice for ED care delivery in the US. This lack of standard leaves a vast practice gap in the delivery of high-quality ED geriatric care.

Objectives: 1. Among emergency nurses, what is their perceived level of compliance to the standardized set of guidelines for current geriatric care, as outlined by the ACEP, AGS, ENA, and SAEM professional organizations? 2. What are the factors associated with high compliance rate for geriatric readiness and friendliness in emergency departments? Interventions: Moving forward education needs to be implemented immediately. Education should take into account the unique physiology, atypical disease presentations, and psychosocial needs of the older persons. It should be tailored to each individual department’s needs.

Evaluation: This study utilized a cross- sectional, online survey study design aimed at examining the readiness and friendliness of ED for the geriatric patient population. An adapted questionnaire was delivered via the Qualtrics online research platform enterprise to a sample of emergency nurses currently working in the EDs in the Midwest region of the US.

Discussion: The study findings illuminated the lack of readiness in eighteen EDs where the study participants work. Both human and capital resources need to be allocated in hospital ERs urgently to meet the burgeoning demand for evidence-based geriatric care in this care setting.

I am a doctorally prepared advanced practice nurse through DePaul University in Chicago. I feel the geriatric population needs a voice. I am making it my mission to do all I can to help my fellow colleagues and myself take care for this immense and vastly complicated population.

Yes N/A (not applicable) Discussion -- -- 15 Minutes -- 15 Minutes -- Kristen Zdany
Maurjeen 309-253-3127 maureen.l.mathews@osfhealthcare.org 200 E. Pennyslvania Ave. Peoria Illinois 61603 DNP, APN, CNP OSF Healthcare APN APRN Midwest Conference Poster Yes Cardiovascular Stroke Neurology Patient Care General Knowledge

Background Anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in non-atrial fibrillation related stroke patients remains controversial. Benefit often off-set by increased hemorrhagic events. In stroke patients with basilar or vertebral diseases, antiplatelet therapies often fail. This retrospective review is examining the outcome of all stroke patients with angiographic proven basilar or vertebral diseases in the stroke clinic who were on long-term warfarin therapy for secondary stroke prevention. Method: This is a retrospective review. Records on patients with posterior circulation stroke from 2010 to 2018 were reviewed. Data collected and analyzed included demographics, stroke location, responsible vertebral basilar diseases, duration of warfarin use, mRS at stroke onset and the last clinical visit, hemorrhagic events and mortality. Descriptive statistic, Cox multivariable analysis were conducted. Results: Of 48 patients with imaging proven vertebral and basilar arterial disease and related strokes, 35 (72%) were female; average age 65(37-89). Imaging study showed 24 with vertebral artery stenosis, 15 with vertebral-basilar (VB) arteriopathy, and 9 with basilar stenosis. Longest use of warfarin 8 years (1-96, average 26 months). Average MRS at onset 1.75 and 1.14 at discharge. Two (4%) had sICH, 2 (4%) recurrent strokes, 4(8%) had recurrent TIAs and 2 (2%) had GI bleed. One died of ICH. Thirty seven (78%) had no further stroke/TIA events. The average INR was 2.46 (1.4-4.1). Patients with warfarin discontinued were more likely to use aspirin and had negative outcomes (stroke/TIA recurrence, hemorrhage), HR 5.41(95% CI, 1.16-25.3. Conclusion: Our study showed long term use of warfarin was effective in this population.

I have been practicing in Stroke Neurology since 2002 in both the inpatient and outpatient setting.  My focus of practice is assisting stroke survivors to regain independence and a satisfactory quality of life, and educating the public on stroke prevention and a healthy lifestyle.

Yes Learner will describe effectiveness of anti coagulation therapy in preventing recurrent stroke in individuals with posterior circulation infarcts .5 (50 percent) Discussion -- -- -- -- -- --

Mohr, J., Thompson, J., Lazar, R., Original Article A Comparison of Warfarin and Aspirin for the Prevention of Recurrent Ischemic Stroke N Engl J Med 2001; 345:1444-1451
Sandercock, P.,Counsell, C., Kane, E., Anticoagulants for acute ischaemic stroke.  12 March 2015, DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000024.pub4

Maureen Mathews
Maurjeen 309-253-3127 maureen.l.mathews@osfhealthcare.org 818 W. St. James Peoria Illinois 61606 DNP, APN, CNP OSF Healthcare Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Yes Cardiovascular Neurology Patient Care General Knowledge

Background: Community Para medicine (CP) programs encompass a multitude of routine healthcare services using emergency medical services, implemented to educate patients in their homes about follow-up care until specialty care is established. With no outcome metrics, it is not possible to measure if the newly implemented CP program provided by the OSF/Illinois Neurological Institute (OSF/INI), is beneficial to patients, the organization, and the program. The objective of this study is achievement of a 90% satisfaction rate indicated by a 4 or 5 on patient satisfaction scores, set by stakeholders of the OSF/INI CP program. Methods: No outcome metrics to date are being measured. A patient satisfaction survey will be implemented to measure participant satisfaction. The patient satisfaction survey will be conducted using an existing survey method, the Abbeville County Emergency Medical Service Evaluation Form, developed to measure patient satisfaction of a current community para medicine program (Bennett et al., 2018). After completion of the satisfaction survey, results will be compared to the organization’s goal. Results: of 271 participants, 31 subjects thus far have met inclusion criteria for the study. Twenty-one subjects have successfully completed the satisfaction surveys. Demographics of the population include: gender, age, diagnosis, 30 day readmission rates, overall value of program/medic, and benefit of service. Demographic statistics will be used to analyze the data. Conclusion: Survey results to date indicate this service is valuable to stroke survivors. The 30 day readmission rates for this group was 14%. The goal of the project has been met.

I have been practicing in Stroke Neurology since 2002.  I have seen patients in both the inpatient and outpatient setting and have consistently focused on the quality of care and providing stroke survivors with the resources and tools to resume a productive life with a satisfactory quality of life.

Yes
Maurjeen 309-253-3127 maureen.l.mathews@osfhealthcare.org 818 W. St. James Peoria Illinois 61606 DNP, APN, CNP OSF Healthcare APRN Midwest Conference Poster Yes Cardiovascular Neurology Patient Care General Knowledge

Background Stroke is an emergency. Emergency response (911) is not being utilized consistently by those witnessing/ experiencing a stroke. Lack of knowledge of emergent nature of stroke, uncertainly of signs and symptoms, and public misconception of stroke impact/outcome, may contribute to low use of EMS. Review of national literature indicates about 50% of individuals experiencing stroke use 911/EMS to arrive at hospital. Educating public about stroke is an important means to address this stroke knowledge deficit and improve utilization of emergency services to transport a suspected stroke patient. We conducted ongoing intense community stroke educational program and here report the outcome. Method: data from 1/2010 - 12/2017 on all patients presenting to a Midwest Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) ED was utilized. Persons arriving within 6 hours of onset were reviewed. Education Campaign initiated in 2012, increase in offerings in 2015. Results Data collected in 2010 showed 68% use of EMT. From 1/2012 to 12/1007, annual use of EMT remained consistently at 75 – 75%. From 1/2012 to 12/2017, annual use of EMT remained consistently at 75 – 75%. Following implementation of an ongoing public education program the percentage of transport to hospital by EMS has consistently averaged 75 – 77%. Discussion Ongoing community stroke educational programs are needed to improve the use of 911 service to transport potential stroke patients. Regardless of the methodology used to educate public, raising awareness could improve behavior when witnessing a stroke. Our public use of EMT for stroke remained consistently above national average.

I have been practicing in Stoke Neurology since 2002 in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.  I am committed to providing restorative care and educating the public regarding healthy behaviors and stroke prevention.

Yes Demonstrate the benefit of a public education campaign in improving response to symptoms of a life threatening health condition and arrival to the hospital in the most effective manner. N/A (not applicable) -- -- 60 minutes -- 60 minutes --

Prabhakaran, S. et al.  2019. The Community Engagement for Early Recognition and Immediate Action in Stroke (CEERIAS)  Study:  Primary Results.  Stroke. 50. 1161

Maureen Mathews
Maurjeen 309-253-3127 maureen.l.mathews@osfhealthcare.org 818 W. St. James Peoria Illinois 61606 DNP, APN, CNP OSF Healthcare Nurse Practitioner APRN Midwest Conference Poster Yes Cardiovascular Neurology Patient Care General Knowledge

Background: Testing platelet function before carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) remains controversial. Of 1262 patients enrolled in Cerebral Revascularization Endarterectomy Stenting Trial (CREST) who received CAS, 98% received antiplatelet medication 48 hours prior to procedure but did not have platelet inhibition tested. 10 year follow up showed post-procedural ipsilateral stroke occurred in 6.9% of patients in CAS group and 5.6% in CEA group. Examination of CAS patients who had platelet inhibition tested at comprehensive stroke center. Method: Records of all patients receiving elective CAS were reviewed. Data collected and analyzed included demographics, degree of carotid disease and locations, doses and types of antiplatelet medication given prior to CAS, levels of platelet inhibition, recurrent stroke, any hemorrhage and mortality. Descriptive statistics were used to report any differences. The target level needed to be between 60-200 P2Y12 response units (PRU) before CAS was scheduled. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: From 4/2013 to 4/2018, 34 patients had platelet inhibition tests prior to CAS. Twenty four (72%) were male and overall average age was 67 (50-84). Their average length of hospital stay was 4.3 days (1-14). Six (18%) had right carotid stenosis, 13 (39%) had left carotid disease, and 14(42%) had bilateral carotid diseases >70%. Complications included 2 (6%) strokes, 2 (6%) sICHs, 1(3%) with hemorrhagic stroke, 1(3%) thrombocytopenia, and 3 (9%) death. All adverse events took place after discharge. Eight (24%) had readmission. Conclusion: Five year complication rate about 5%/year. Benefit of checking platelet inhibition prior to CAS could not be demonstrated.

I have been practicing in Stroke Neurology since 2002 in both the inpatient and outpatient setting.  My focus of practice is assisting stroke survivors to regain independence and a satisfactory quality of life, and educating the public on stroke prevention and a healthy lifestyle.

Yes Learner will verbalize results of experience checking platelet assays prior to elective carotid artery stenting. N/A (not applicable) Discussion -- -- 60 minutes -- 60 minutes -- , ,

Kass-Hout, T.,  et. al. Neurointerventional Stenting and Antiplatelet Function Testing: To Do or Not to Do? Interv Neurol. 2015 Jul; 3(3-4): 184–189.

Maureen Mathews
Maura Jarka 708-516-3999 maura32321@gmail.com 15613 Innsbrook Dr Orland Park Illinois 60462 APN Cardiac Surgery Associates APRN Midwest Conference Poster Mental Health, Cardiovascular Patient Care General Knowledge

PANDAS is short for Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection. This is an autoimmune condition triggered by a strep infection. This occurs when the immune system produces antibodies that attack healthy tissue in the basal ganglia of the brain, which results in inflammation. The inflammation results in abnormal neurological behaviors. It is estimated that 1 in 200 children may have PANDAS (Pandas Network). PANDAS was first identified in 1998, when Dr. Swedo identified a subgroup of children that developed sudden onset OCD, the common thread in these children was GABHS.In 2002 the first clinical study was published, Murphy ad Pichichero reported that over a 3 year time 12 school aged student that exhibited OCD behaviors, all tested positive for GABHS, and all showed very high antideoxyribonuclease titers. When treating children with antibiotics and eradicating GABHS, the OCD symptoms disappeared. Reoccurrence was seen in 6 patients, each reoccurrence was associated with GABHS. In this study the most predominate OCD symptom was hand washing and the preoccupation with germs. Recognizing PANDAS can be difficult for providers and often goes unrecognized and misdiagnosed as mental illness. It is a clinical diagnosis of signs, symptoms and laboratory findings. The National Institute of Mental Health has published the following criteria for Diagnosing PANDAS: 1. Presence of clinically significant obsession/compulsion 2. Abrupt onset of symptoms 3. Symptoms evident between ages of 3 and puberty 4. Associated with Group A Strep 5. Associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms. I would like to raise awareness of PANDAS providers.

My passion regarding PANS/PANDAS is Maya, She is my 12 year old daugher that was diagnosed with PANDAS after suffering for 2 years . As a nurse, we hope to be abe to help those close to us, and I was at a loss with my daughters illness. I do not practice pediatric medicine, actully I am a nurse practitioner for a large Cardiovascular Surgery group. In my free time I guide parents of possible PANS/PANDAS children. My hope is to educate NP’s, they are often the first provider these parents and patients meet.

Yes Participants will be able to identify symptoms of PANS/PANDAS., Partipants will be able to list 2-3 diagnostic criteria for accurately diagnosing PANDAS/PANS, Participants will be able toidentify different treatment modalities for PANDAS -- -- -- -- -- --

PANDAS/PANS Physician Network
PANDAS Network

Maura Jarka
Andy Williams 630-854-9097 andy@a-mmedia.com 0 APRN Midwest Conference Poster -- -- -- -- -- --